FHFA increases conforming loan limits for the first time in a decade

For the first time since the housing crisis, the Federal Housing Finance Agency is increasing the maximum conforming loan limits for mortgages to be acquired by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in 2017.

For much of the country, the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac loan limit remained at $417,000 for one-unit properties (or single-family homes) in 2016, just as it had for the previous 10 years.

The FHFA announced last week that for 2017, it is increasing the loan limit from $417,000 to $424,100 for single-family homes.  Loan limits will also be increasing in what the FHFA calls “high-cost areas,” where 115% of the local median home value exceeds the baseline loan limit.

Maximum Original Principal Balance for 2017

Units Contiguous States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, and the U.S. Virgin Islands
1 $424,100 $636,150
2 $543,000 $814,500
3 $656,350 $984,525
4 $815,650 $1,223,475

Maximum Loan Limits for High-Cost Areas for Mortgages Acquired in Calendar Year 2017

All but 87 counties (or county equivalents) will see a loan limit increase.

Units Contiguous States, District of Columbia+ Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, and the U.S. Virgin Islands
1 $636,150 $954,225
2 $814,500 $1,221,750
3 $984,525 $1,476,775
4 $1,223,475 $1,835,200

+A number of other states and Puerto Rico do not have any high-cost areas in 2017.

For a full list of the conforming loan limits by county, click here.